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Cycling versus Continuous High Pressure treatments at moderate temperatures: Effect on bacterial spores?

Abstract : The advantage of using high pressure (HP) cycling treatment compared with continuous HP treatment was investigated for the inactivation of bacterial spores. The effects of parameters such as pulse number, pressure level, treatment temperature, compression and decompression rates, and time between pulses were evaluated. For this purpose, Bacillus subtilis and B. cereus spores (108 and 106 CFU/mL respectively) were suspended in 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution, tryptone salt (TS) buffer solution, or infant milk and treated by HP cycling at 300–400 MPa, at 38–60 °C, for 1–5 pulses. Pressure cycling reduced the number of viable spores by 1.8 and 5.9 log respectively for B. subtilis and B. cereus species. Continuous HP treatments were performed at the same pressure and temperature for similar treatment durations. Our results showed that the spore inactivation ratio was correlated with the cumulative exposure time to pressure rather than to effects of the cycling process. Greater spore inactivation caused by HP cycling was observed only when faster compression and decompression rates were applied, probably due to adiabatic heating. A three-step kinetic model was developed, which seemed to support our hypothesis regarding the mechanisms of inactivation by pressure cycling and continuous HP treatments.
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Submitted on : Tuesday, October 26, 2021 - 3:22:55 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, October 27, 2021 - 4:00:42 AM

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Fatima Fekraoui, Eric Ferret, Nathalie Paniel, Olivia Auvy, Clara Chamontin, et al.. Cycling versus Continuous High Pressure treatments at moderate temperatures: Effect on bacterial spores?. Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies, Elsevier, 2021, 74, pp.102828. ⟨10.1016/j.ifset.2021.102828⟩. ⟨hal-03404261⟩

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